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If there is one recurring question, one that I continue to encounter on this quest to promote brain healthy lifestyles, it is this: How do we overcome the challenges of the aging brain? 

My answer? Embrace it.

Kalynn Amadio, host of The Boomer's Ultimate Guide Podcast, asked me how it is different speakng with Baby Boomers and that recurring question frames my answer. 

We, the Baby Boomer generation, have been taught that we are on this path, from birth to death and that along the way we lose brain cells and with them, hope of functioning well. 

That, my friends, is simply not true. We need to push those out dated notions out of our lives.  

We can guide our experience and our paths to live a better, richer, fuller cognitive life -- one where we solve big problems, tackle tasks (large and small), and function well in our worlds.

Listen in as Kalynn and I talk about the gifts and the power of our aging brains and soooo much more! 

 
 
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On stop #3 I had the honor of speaking with Doug Foresta on Empowerment Radio on his show Creating Change. 

LISTEN IN HERE!

Doug speaks about creativity and how to harness and maximize its power to live a better life. Yes, a conversation that fits my point of view perfectly.

We talked about how to replace negative thoughts with creative thoughts and how to shift your perspective, ever so slightly, so that you may live a life more fueled by the creativity.

How do you do that? Wake up your brain by activating your senses! 

Did you know that using the sense of smell is one of the most powerful and under-utilized tools to spark creativity? 

Think about this: Particular scents/odors/smells trigger not just memories but have that ability to transport you across space and time. How often does a memory triggered by something you smell, carry emotion and color and depth? 

That bond between memory and the sense of smell is a gateway to spark creating new rich, deep, emotion filled memories. 
 
 
You are more likely to know someone walking through the fog of brain injury than you are to know someone with cancer.

Really, you are.  Think about this:
  • 1.8 million people each year are diagnosed in the Emergency Room each and every year with brain injury from some kind of blow to the head
  • 700,000 people have strokes that have some thinking deficits as part of the package, each and every year
Add to that the fact that no one really keep stats on those brain injuries related to chemo-therapy, anesthesia, medications, and neurological diseases that pop up each and every year. Now consider unknown number of combat-related brain injuries and all those brain injuries that are still significant but not diagnosed in the ER (like mine).

Trust me. You know someone who has had a brain injury.
In today's featured broadcast on the Being Brain Healthy Virtual Book Tour I speak with an amazing woman, Tami Neuman from the Care Radio Network and host of Conversations in Care. Tami has  years of experience caring for dementia patients and she really gets it that "reality" (yes those are air quotes) is not the same for everyone and that support for those with brain challenges is best given with a healthy dose of compassion and joy.

In addition to everyday brain health and turning up the noise on life, Tami and I spoke about promoting dignity, self-respect, and understanding for those we are supporting by treating each as intelligent, vibrant adults. We talked about how I realized one day that we all (yes all of us) speak to people who are struggling to think or understand as if they were children – we speak slowly and clearly using simple, tiny words – and that is just not OK.

Listen in our conversation HERE.  Warning: Listening to Conversations in Care may be habit forming!

What have you noticed about how people change when they care for others?

Here's to remembering to put dignity, self-respect, and quality of life at the core of caring for others.
 
 
Finding hope in aging is a challenge that we must take on in order to thrive.
Finding humor and all that is good in that crazy process is exactly what I spoke to 2 Boomer Broads about on the first stop on the Virtual Book Tour to promote Being Brain Healthy, the book, and spreading the hopeful message about brain healthy choices and lifestyles.

We talked a lot about the sense of smell and how to use that sense to activate your brain and your life.  Did you know that you can use the sense of smell to spur creativity? Or that pairing a scent with an item will increase the chances of remembering it? Listen in to find out more!
Check out the tour line-up on the Book Tour page on RollingMulliganPublishing.com

Next stop Conversations in Care with Tami Neuman on BlogTalk Radio!

This entry was originally published on www.craniumcrunches.com.
 
 

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 I've been thinking about living intentionally and what that means for my day-to-day life. 

I have goals. They are good goals according to all goal evaluation criteria I know and preach to others. They are WHY SMART goals.

That means they are:
Written
Harmonious with who I am
Yours (mine -- not someone else's)

And they are:
Specific
Measurable
Attainable
Realistically high
Time bound

So I know they are great places for me to focus.

Living intentionally goes beyond setting those goals and choosing activities that will allow me to attain them. It is intentionally paying attention to what is going on around me and shifting my perspective so I don't miss what might be the most important thing for me -- those things that will help me build a better brain. 

Here, from Being Brain Healthy, is what I believe we all need to focus on, intentionally, and roll into our daily lives to live and "Be" better.

Be active
. There is no better way to nourish yourself mind, body, and soul than to take an active approach to life. Be a thinker, a doer, a creator, and a motivator. Move your body, use your mind, and think bigger.

Be social. Not only are we better together, but reaching out to other people also activates multiple areas of the brain. When you interact with others, you stimulate multiple areas of your brain so sensory, language, memory, logic and reasoning, and emotional areas all work in concert.

Be engaged. Participate in things that fire your passion and excite you. Some days, it is not enough to just be active and social. Throw yourself in fully and participate in life by becoming a vital part of every experience. 

Be purposeful. Find what drives you–those things that give you a reason to be—and work toward them. When you live more purposefully, you fill holes in your life and also contribute to something greater.

Be complicated. Combine activities and focuses. Make the most out of each moment by drawing from everything you know that helps you think and live better, and activate as much of that as possible all at once.  

What do you do to Be Intentional in your daily life?